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20121223
20121223
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or requirements that we talked about? >> guest: well, george washington didn't think a lot of the militia. he grouched about it at times, but he also made remarks that allowed how the militia was a useful thing to have and couldn't have bill the army without the existence of the militia and people in the militias, and more importantly, volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was key. >> host: so people used these on the frontier, protection against the indians, native americans, hunting certainly, and then during the colonies, some sense of responsibility for the common good. >> guest: exactly. the right, the common law right to have and use firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of the militias? >> guest: well, local commanders, towns had them, in new england certainly, and later on, they became more broadly based, but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities and the colonists, the approach to revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans kne
, associate professor, ten years. george washington university, clinical professor of neurology, ten years. 14 books, including most recently mysteries of the mind. richard martin restak. >> dr. restak, you have had quite an extraordinary career. first of all, you taught at georgetown. >> yes. >> then you abandoned the jesuits or did they dump you? then you moved over to g.w. >> yes. >> do you still teach inta at georgetown? >> i'm in the faculty but spend most of my time at g.w. >> okay. i have that number, by the way, and england and wales, out of every millionth person born alive in 1880, only 223 could expect to be alive 100 years later. 1880. so that's 112 years from now. 110, about that. for those born in 1990, out of one million people, 8,710 can one million people, 8,710 can infants born in 2025 can expect to live 100 years. >> well, we should have cancer and heart disease, the big killers, under better control by that time, because people don't really die of brain disease. it is from other organs failing. >> and those organs can be maintained in improved health if the brain is servici
of time life looks, writes regularly for "the washington post" and our web site is rachel cox.com -- >> rachel as cox. >> rachel s. cox.com, sorry about that, and this is her first book, "into dust and fire" five young americans who went to fight the nazi army. this is booktv on c-span2. >> tell us what you think about a programming this weekend. you can tweet us of booktv. >> this is the cover of john goodman's newest book called "priceless" curing the health care crisis. booktv is some acacia net freedomfest in las vegas and dr. john goodman joins us now to talk about "priceless." dr. goodman lets start by asking you about the recent supreme court decision on the health care bill. what is your view of? >> i was sorry to see that decision. i wish the court had thrown out upon the care and we could start over and have a more rational health care reform. now we are going to have to deal with the law as it is and i think though even the supporters of the law are going to want to make major changes within and next year and to have. >> okay, let's start. what do you see as rationa
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3